Evaluating Well Performance For Unconventional and Conventional Reservoirs Using the Recovery Factor and Apparent Frac Length Techniques

INSTRUCTOR: Robert 'Bob' Barba
DISCIPLINE: Engineering &Unconventional Reservoirs
COURSE LENGTH (DAYS): 3 Days
CEUS: 2.4
AVAILABILITY: Public & In-House 

 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Engineers, managers, and geoscientists concerned that their reservoirs may not be completed using the best possible techniques.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONSo, your well didn’t come in as expected. Was it the reservoir, the frac treatment, or a combination of both? This three-day course is designed for engineers, geoscientists, and asset managers who want to maximize asset value in horizontal or vertical wells in unconventional and conventional reservoirs. Course participants will take away a methodology that evaluates well performance using the recovery factor technique for all reservoirs and the effective frac length technique for conventional reservoirs. When combined with characterization of the mechanical properties, a determination can be made whether poor production is a function of a poor completion, poor reservoir rock, or both.

The methodology utilizes basic open hole wireline logs, core data, pre-frac pump-in test (DFIT) data, and production data to predict production performance as a function of recovery factor and effective frac length. The data can then be used to determine what completion practices are creating the highest recovery factors and/or longest effective frac lengths in a well or in each perforation cluster (the latter if production logs are available). Case studies are presented from previous “best practices” studies in both oil and gas reservoirs to reinforce the concepts. Recent evaluation of over 1,200 wells in Permian Basin organic shales has yielded excellent results in predicting estimated ultimate recoveries prior to the frac as a function of the various completion options (SPE 174994 2015 ATCE). A key part of the model development is the generation of a calibrated petrophysical model that provides oil or gas in place, permeability, and key rock properties.

Participants will receive a comprehensive log analysis spreadsheet that can be used to calculate all the inputs required to develop calibrated reservoir and mechanical properties in ASCII format to load directly into a 3D hydraulic fracture simulator. The course is not intended to make participants expert log analysts or completion engineers; however, they should be well informed consumers of service company and in-house log analysis resources to be able to develop well performance models specific to their reservoirs. Participants are encouraged to provide local examples for discussion of model implementation and possible “best practices” for their areas of activity.

A LAPTOP IS REQUIRED WITH MICROSOFT EXCEL AND ADOBE READER INSTALLED.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

  • Maximize asset value in horizontal or vertical wells in unconventional and conventional reservoirs
  • Learn methods that evaluates well performance using the recovery factor technique for all reservoirs and the effective frac length technique for conventional reservoirs
  • Determine if poor production is a function of a poor completion, poor reservoir rock, or both
  • Calculate all the inputs required to develop calibrated reservoir and mechanical properties in ASCII format to load directly into a 3D hydraulic fracture simulator
  • Develop well performance models specific to their reservoirs

 

COURSE CONTENT:

  • Review of basic log analysis techniques
  • Log quality control and calibration steps
  • Recovery factor model data requirements
  • Effective frac length model data requirements
  • Net pay model calibration using log, core, DFIT, well test, and production data
  • Permeability, rock properties and reservoir pressure model calibration to field data
  • Integration of rock properties, permeability, and reservoir pressure models
  • Basic production decline curve analysis
  • Effective frac length exercises
  • Historical best practices for improving effective frac length
  • Review of student provided case studies and discussion

 

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